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Forum :: W. W. Doak Miramichi Atlantic Salmon Discussion Board :: Fly Discussion :: New flies/old flies Search: Advance Search

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campbells
 New flies/old flies - Jun 21, 2011, 05:53:30 AM #1

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Post: 7
Registered: 02.06.2011
Some of us are using the European style tube flies and to a lesser degree Waddington shanks, and fly designs like the sunray shadow or monkey fly concepts. There are times when these flies seem to be more attractive than our standard wet flies, but I'm finding myself drifting back to traditional designs and patterns for most of my fishing. Has anyone else experimented with the modern European styles?
 
Howie
 Re: New flies/old flies - Apr 07, 2012, 09:28:25 AM #2

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Post: 3
Registered: 10.07.2011
I started tinkering with tubes this winter. They are very enjoyable to tie but I have no clue how they fish. I like the idea of a large presence for high water coupled with a much smaller hook than a traditionally tied 'spring' or 'fall' fly. This one is tied in the temple dog style:



And another:

 
campbells
 Re: New flies/old flies - Apr 07, 2012, 14:56:34 PM #3

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Post: 7
Registered: 02.06.2011
Howie - excellent looking flies. A friend and I just came back from fishing in Scotland, and tubes have almost entirely taken over there, especially for larger flies. They don't have to be large though. I personally prefer conventional flies tied on the hook shank for anything smaller than say a #4, but some folks do fish some very short tubes.
Most of the tubes are fished no differently than our standard wet flies. there are two exceptions that I can think. The first is the very popular sunray shadow. While this long, snakey fly can be fished on the swing, most people do a little stripping along with it. The sunray is highly thought of for its ability to elicit a strike from stale fish. The fly is cast square across the current and stripped quickly by the fish. I've tried that technique a little on the M, but I haven't done all that well with it. The other exception is when the tube is fished on a sink tip line and mending is done to get a slow, deep presentation. I have seen that work wonders in the fall on the M and the Cains when the water begings to get cold.
 

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